Lecture Series

Dr. Jousse Lecture Series

Welcome to the new Dr. Albin T Jousse Lecture Series in collaboration with Best Practice Forum, which is sponsored by the Rehabilitation Engineering Laboratory, the Spinal Cord Rehab Program, the Activity Team, and Toronto Rehab.

The purpose of this lecture series is to provide a venue for scientists, physicians and clinicians working in rehab settings as well as students, consumers and their caregivers to share knowledge, present the latest research findings and participate in a dialogue on what it means to live with disability. The timetable for the lectures along with the presenters is given below. All lectures are presented at the Lyndhurst Center (directions), from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. The lectures will be 45 minute long followed by 15 minutes of questions.

Coordinators of the Dr. Albin T. Jousse Lecture Series are Takashi Yoshida and José Zariffa. If you have any comments, concerns or would like to present please send us an email at jose.zariffa [at] utoronto.ca.

Season 10: 2016-2017 Schedule

Date Location Presenter Topic
Sept 1 Click here Dr. Matija Milosevic Trunk impairment and how to improve sitting balance after spinal cord injury
Sept 8 Click here Dr. Michael Willand Using electrical stimulation to enhance functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury
Oct 13 Click here Dr. Kara K Patterson I’ve got rhythm, I’ve got music, who could ask for anything more? The use of rhythm, music and dance in the rehabilitation of gait and balance in neurological patient populations
Nov 2 Click here Dr. Angelo All A novel biomedical approach for rehab post-SCI
Nov 10 Click here Drs. Kristin Musselman & Alison Oates Falls After Spinal Cord Injury: Causes, Consequences And Creative Solutions
Dec 8 Click here Dr. Cesar Marquez Chin Brain-Machine Interfaces at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute
Jan 12 Click here Dr. B. Catharine Craven Bone Health Services for SLOP: Myths, FAQ, & Program Self Evaluation
Feb 9 Click here Dr. Milos R. Popovic Electrical Stimulation: Improving walking, treating depression and controlling stem cell mobility
Mar 9 Click here Dr. Julio C. Furlan In the Age of Aging, what is actually the impact of older age on outcomes after traumatic spinal cord injury?
Apr 13 Click here Dr. Kei Masani Balance control of upright posture
May 11 Click here Dr. José Zariffa Measuring Upper Limb Function in the Community Using Novel Wearable Technology

Detailed Description of Each Lecture & Presenter

Sept. 1


Dr. Matija Milosevic

Biography:


Matija Milosevic is an NSERC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Tokyo in Japan. Prior to moving to Tokyo, Matija completed his PhD in biomedical engineering at the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto and the Rehabilitation Engineering Laboratory, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-UHN. His main research was related to postural control and neuromuscular modelling of sitting and standing balance, and use of functional electrical stimulation. Matija’s current research is focused on exploring neurophysiology and neuroplasticity during motor control tasks as a way to enhance the function of individuals with neurological and physical impairments as well as to maximize the performance of athletes. Matija’s research expertise includes biomechanics, biomedical instrumentation, neurophysiology, neuroprostheses, modeling, signal processing and rehabilitation.

Title: Trunk impairment and how to improve sitting balance after spinal cord injury

Abstract:
Spinal cord injury (SCI) could result in paralysis of the trunk and lower limb muscles which can significantly impair trunk stability and sitting balance. However, very little is known about the complex neuromuscular coordination of the trunk muscles and the effects of SCI. Currently, chest straps and trunk braces are used to stabilize the trunk and correct sitting after SCI. In addition to these passive devices, functional electrical stimulation (FES) could be used to artificially contract trunk muscles and regulate sitting balance. In this talk, I will present: (1) what we know about trunk muscle coordination; (2) how SCI affects trunk muscle coordination during sitting; and (3) how we can use FES to improve sitting balance. Understanding trunk muscle impairment in combination with the use of FES can provide important implications for optimizing sitting balance rehabilitation.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Sept. 8


Dr. Michael Willand

Biography:


Michael Willand is currently a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Plastic Surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Mike previously completed MASc and PhD degrees in biomedical engineering at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. He specialized in the design and development of novel electrical stimulators and investigated combining surgical modalities with electrical muscle stimulation to enhance functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury. His current work focuses on examining how different paradigms of electrical muscle stimulation affect reinnervation following nerve injury and repair. He is also investigating the role that electrical stimulation has in synkinetic reinnervation and the molecular basis for enhancement of reinnervation following chronic muscle stimulation.

Title: Using electrical stimulation to enhance functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury

Abstract:
Recovery following peripheral nerve injuries is often incomplete. Injured nerves regenerate at a rate of approximately 1mm/day, but the longer they are without a functional connection the more diminished their capacity to regenerate becomes. In traumatic injuries, the gold standard treatment is surgical nerve repair performed immediately or shortly after injury. To date, there are no additional treatments that are used to enhance functional recovery. In this talk I will outline ongoing experiments investigating a clinically translatable daily electrical muscle stimulation paradigm in rats following nerve injury. I will also discuss a treatment of brief electrical nerve stimulation performed at the time of nerve repair that is used to accelerate nerve outgrowth across the injury site. Taken together, these two therapies may form a synergistic front used to enhance recovery following peripheral nerve injuries.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Oct. 13


Dr. Kara K Patterson

Biography:


Dr. Patterson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Toronto and a Scientist with Toronto Rehab. She received her physiotherapy training from Queen’s University and practiced clinically in Canada and the United States before returning to Canada to pursue graduate studies. She received her MSc and PhD in Rehabilitation Science from UofT and completed postdoctoral training at McGill. The overall goal of Dr. Patterson’s research program (which takes place in the RELEARN lab) is to advance neurorehabilitation practice to improve balance and mobility outcomes for people living with neurological conditions. She is currently investigating the process of motor re-learning after stroke, the link between rhythm perception and gait and the use of dance to improve walking and balance post-stroke. Her work is funded by CIHR, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Physiotherapy Foundation of Canada.

Title: I’ve got rhythm, I’ve got music, who could ask for anything more? The use of rhythm, music and dance in the rehabilitation of gait and balance in neurological patient populations.

Abstract:
Walking, balance and mobility are almost invariably affected by neurological conditions. Gait and balance impairments have a profound impact on an individual’s ability to perform activities of daily living and consequently, quality of life and improvement of gait function is a commonly stated goal by individuals undergoing neurologic rehabilitation. Improvements in gait, mobility and balance are made with neurological rehabilitation. However, despite these gains, balance and gait remain significantly impaired compared to healthy or neurotypical adults. New therapeutic approaches and interventions for balance, mobility and gait are needed. The use of rhythmic cues during gait training and dance instruction are emerging interventions that may address this need. In this talk I will discuss 1) the potential link between rhythmic abilities (e.g. perception and production) and the rhythmicity of gait and 2) the use of dance for the rehabilitation of gait in neurological populations. Although the primary focus of my research is stroke, I will discuss potential applications in other patient populations such as spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Nov. 2


Dr. Angelo All

Biography:


Angelo ALL, M.D., MBA, is an Assistant Professor at the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He also holds a position as an Assistant Professor at the Departments of Orthopedic Surgery and Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore. Dr. All is the Research Director of the Spinal Cord Injury, Repair and Regeneration Research Laboratory.

Title: A novel biomedical approach for rehab post-SCI.

Abstract:
We have investigated the properties of a novel UpConverting Nanoparticles (UCNPs) that are able to emit visible light by stimulating them with LED based Near Infra-Red (NIR) system. These UCNPs could upconvert within the biological window of 740nm, which reduces heat and toxicity to cells, and activate the light-sensitive ion channels known as Channelrhodopsin (ChRs) in transfected neuropathways deep in the CNS. These semi-invasive techniques can be used for Rehabilitation post-Spinal Cord Injury and for Deep Brain Stimulation.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Nov. 10


Dr. Kristin Musselman


Dr. Alison Oates

Biography:


Kristin Musselman, PT PhD, is a Scientist with the Neural Engineering and Therapeutics Team at TRI-UHN, an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Physical Therapy at the University of Toronto, and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Physical Therapy at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research is focused on the rehabilitation for adults and children with neurological conditions, including methods of training gait, balance and upper limb function. Alison Oates PhD is an Assistant Professor in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research focuses on sensorimotor integration during walking and walking balance in populations with instability. Alison will discuss collaborative research with Dr. Musselman investigating reactive and proactive balance during walking in individuals with incomplete SCI. She will also highlight the Biomechanics of Balance And Movement (BBAM) Lab of which she is a co-director.

Title: Falls After Spinal Cord Injury: Causes, Consequences And Creative Solutions.

Abstract:
Each year about 75% of community-dwelling individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) will fall; this is a higher fall incidence than that seen in other neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease. Falling can have many adverse consequences, such as injury, hospital admission, reduced mobility and participation in daily activities, to name a few. Despite the high risk of falling, little is known about the causes and consequences of falls, or how fall risk can be reduced, in the SCI population. Drs. Oates and Musselman will discuss their joint work that aims to address these gaps in our knowledge and result in more effective fall prevention strategies for the SCI population.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Dec. 8


Dr. Cesar Marquez Chin

Biography:


Dr. Márquez Chin is a scientist with the Neural Engineering and Therapeutics Team at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - University Health Network. A biomedical engineer by training, his professional activities have included clinical, research, and development settings. His primary research interests include the development and understanding of rehabilitation technologies and the interaction between these devices and their users, including consumers and care providers. Central to his work is the creation of systems that use brain signals to control electronic devices. His current areas of work include neurophysiological research, brain-machine interfacing, and rehabilitation robotics. Dr. Márquez Chin holds a PhD in biomedical engineering from the University of Toronto.

Title: Brain-Machine Interfaces at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute.

Abstract:
Did you know that the Lyndhurst Centre has an active research program connecting brains and machines directly? In this talk I will introduce brain-computer interfaces, devices that can translate brain signals into control commands for electronic devices, share with you some of the work conducted in this field at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute over the last decade, and discuss potential applications of this technology for rehabilitation after stroke and spinal cord injury.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Jan 12


Dr. B. Catharine Craven, BA, MD, FRCP(C), MSc

Biography:


Dr. Craven is a Clinician Scientist appointed as an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Toronto. She is a Senior Scientist within the Neural Engineering and Therapeutics Team at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the Medical Lead of the Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program at Toronto Rehab’s Lyndhurst Centre within University Health Network.

Dr. Craven’s clinical and research expertise is in the prevention and treatment of secondary health conditions among individuals living with spinal cord injury and their related health service needs. Her recent work has focused on the associations between changes in body composition and multimorbidity among individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (PubMed).

Dr Craven led publication of the E-scan Atlas “Capturing Capacity in Canadian SCI Rehabilitation”. Dr. Craven, together with Dr. Bayley, co-leads the SCI-HIGH project aimed at developing structure, process and outcome indicators to advance SCI rehabilitation in Canada by 2020. She is also the project lead and driving force behind Toronto Rehab’s innovative Central Recruitment implementation, uniting clinicians and researchers around best-practice patient recruitment. Dr. Craven is the current Chair of the Rick Hansen Institute Care Committee; a recent recipient of a Craig H Neilsen Foundation senior scientist award; and the scientific co-chair of the 1-7th National SCI conference.

Title: Bone Health Services for SLOP: Myths, FAQ, & Program Self Evaluation

Abstract:
Objectives:

1) To discuss common myths and frequently asked questions regarding sublesional osteoporosis

2) Identify patients with spinal cord injury/disease & sublesional osteoporosis who require therapy

3) Select appropriate osteoporosis therapy based on the clinical scenario, patient’s fracture risk, and therapy side effect profile

4) Review the principles of post-fracture care

5) Complete a program Bone Health Self evaluation

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Feb. 9


Dr. Milos R. Popovic, PhD, PEng

Biography:


Milos R. Popovic received his Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Toronto, Canada in 1996, and the Dipl. Electrical Engineer degree from the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1990.

Dr. Popovic is the Associate Scientific Director at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - University Health Network and the Toronto Rehab Chair in Spinal Cord Injury Research. He is also a Professor (Tenured) in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, as well as Senior Scientist and the Neural Engineering and Therapeutics Team Leader at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. Dr. Popovic is also the founder and co-director of the CenteR for Advancing Neurotechnological Innovation to Application (CRANIA) at the University of Toronto and University Health Network.

Dr. Popovic’s fields of expertise are functional electrical stimulation, neuroprostheses, neuro-rehabilitation, neuromodulation, brain machine interfaces, physiological control systems, assistive technology, modeling and control of linear and non-linear dynamic systems, robotics, and signal processing.

In 1997, together with Dr. Keller, he received the Swiss National Science Foundation Technology Transfer Award - 1st place. In 2008, Dr. Popovic was awarded the Engineering Medal for Research and Development from the Professional Engineers of Ontario, and Ontario Society of Professional Engineers. In 2011, he was elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. In 2012, company MyndTec Inc., which Dr. Popovic co-founded in 2008, won the 1st Prize and the Best Intellectual Property Award at the annual TiEQuest Business Venture Competition. In 2013, he received the Morris (Mickey) Milner Award for outstanding contributions in the area of Assistive Technologies from the Health Technology Exchange. Also, in 2013, together with Drs. Prodic, Lehn, and Huerta-Olivares, and Mr. Tarulli, Dr. Popovic received the University of Toronto Inventor of the Year Award. In 2015, Dr. Popovic received the 2014 University Health Network’s Inventor of the Year Award.

Dr. Popovic is the co-founder and co-chair of the Canadian National Spinal Cord Injury Conference established in 2004.

Title: Electrical Stimulation: Improving walking, treating depression and controlling stem cell mobility.

Abstract:
In this lecture three different applications of electrical stimulation will be discussed. In one embodiment, the electrical stimulation is used as a tool to improve voluntary locomotion. In second embodiment, the electrical stimulation is used to change mood. And in third embodiment, the electrical stimulation is used to navigate stem cells and direct their movement. All three interventions have one thing in common. They use identical electrical stimulation pulses and identical software-hardware systems to deliver very different clinical interventions. These interventions belong to a broader spectrum of neuromodulation interventions. Hence, this entire lecture will be focused on presenting unique and unusual neuromodulation interventions of great relevance to the spinal cord injury population.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Mar. 9


Dr. Julio C. Furlan, MD, LLB, MBA, MSc, PhD, FRCPC

Biography:


Dr. Furlan is a staff neurologist and a Clinician Investigator in the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the SCI Rehabilitation Program at the Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Toronto. He recently completed five years of residency training in Adult Neurology at University of Toronto in June 2014. Most recently he completed a two-year clinical fellowship in Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Sunnybrook Hospital and the University of Toronto (2014 to June 2016).

Dr Furlan has extensive training and research expertise. He is a trained head and neck surgeon from Brazil, who holds a MBA degree in Health Administration, an MSc degree in Clinical Epidemiology, and a PhD degree in Neuroanatomy. In the past, Dr. Furlan has worked as an Associate Research Scientist in the Department of Genetics and Development, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network from 2007 to 2012. Dr. Furlan has also been an Adjunct Scientist at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network from 2009-2016, inclusive.

Dr Furlan´s research has been focused on outcome measures (including clinical assessments, neuroimaging analysis, and neurophysiological assessments) and predictors of outcome (including sex and age) after traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injury. In addition he has interest and expertise in autonomic dysfunction after spinal cord injury and economic analyses. Dr. Furlan has published 75 peer-reviewed papers and 14 book chapters, and received 43 awards over the past 15 years.

Title: In the Age of Aging, what is actually the impact of older age on outcomes after traumatic spinal cord injury?

Abstract:

Despite an increasing incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) in the elderly worldwide, relatively little has been reported to date regarding the role of age on outcomes after tSCI.

This series of studies examined the potential effects of older age on: (1) survival, degree of impairment and disability within the first year after tSCI; (2) neuroinflammatory response to, oligodentrocyte apoptosis and axonal survival within the spinal cord white matter after tSCI using immunohistopathological examination of post-mortem spinal cord tissue; and (c) economic burden of the initial management of individuals with acute tSCI.

Overall, the results of those studies support the notion that older people can potentially have similar benefits of the ongoing translational studies focused on neuroprotective and rehabilitative strategies. Also, improved protocols for management of older people with tSCI could have a significant impact on their recovery, which in the long term, could potentially offset the increased healthcare costs during the initial management of the elderly with tSCI.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Apr. 13


Dr. Kei Masani

Biography:


Kei Masani received a Ph.D. degree in physical and health education from the University of Tokyo. He is a Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and an Assistant Professor at Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, the University of Toronto. Previously he was an Assistant Professor in Life Sciences, the University of Tokyo. He is a member of the International Society for Posture and Gait Research, the Society for Neuroscience, the International Society of Biomechanics, and the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society. His research aims to improve the mobility of people who experience neurological impairment. His approach to investigating human movement is undertaken from a neuromechanical perspective, i.e. the union of neurophysiology and physics. With this in mind, he focuses specifically on developing accurate assessments and therapeutic tools using functional electrical stimulation for standing, walking and adapted exercise.

Title: Balance control of upright posture

Abstract:

Compromised standing and walking functions in people with spinal cord injury critically limit the affected individuals’ ability to perform activities of daily living, and reduce their quality of life. The use of FES therapy to train impaired balance may be an effective approach to improve an individual’s ability to maintain balance of upright posture, and subsequently quality of life. Toward developing a clinically-feasible FES therapy for training impaired balance, we have been investigating the upright balance control system in humans. This lecture will summarize how humans control equilibrium of upright posture and will introduce our idea of using FES therapy for training standing balance.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

May. 11


Dr. José Zariffa

Biography:


Dr. José Zariffa is a Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute – University Health Network and an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Zariffa received his Ph.D. degree in electrical and biomedical engineering from the University of Toronto. He then completed post-doctoral fellowships at the International Collaboration On Repair Discoveries (ICORD) in Vancouver, Canada, and at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, where he was supported by Spinal Cord Injury Ontario.

His research interests are in neuroprosthetics and technology for upper limb neurorehabilitation, encompassing work in neural interfaces, wearable sensors, rehabilitation robotics, and electrophysiology.

Title: Measuring Upper Limb Function in the Community Using Novel Wearable Technology

Abstract:

After cervical SCI, a key objective is to maximize the functional use of the upper limb in activities of daily living (ADL). Currently, we lack the ability to directly measure how a person uses their upper limb to perform ADLs once they have been discharged to the community. Doing so would be of great benefit in gauging the true impact of rehabilitation interventions. This talk will give an overview of our laboratory’s work in developing wearable technology capable of measuring how individuals with cervical SCI are using their hands outside of a laboratory or clinical environment. Our approach is based on the use of wearable cameras that record the user’s point of view (egocentric video). Work on quantifying both the quantity and quality of hand use will be discussed, as well as the privacy considerations associated with the use of wearable cameras.

Location: Lecture Rooms A & B, Lyndhurst Centre, Toronto Rehab Institute

Time: 12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Previous Presenters

Season Date Presenter Topic
Season 1: 2007 - 2008 Sep. 13 Dr. Milos R. Popovic Current State of Research In The REL.
Oct. 11 Dr. B. Catharine Craven ASIA Exam: A Users Guide for Engineers.
Nov. 8 Dr. Noritaka Kawashima Neurophysiological Basis of Human Bipedal Locomotion.
Dec. 13 Dr. Kei Masani Control Mechanism of Balance During Quiet Standing.
Jan. 10 Dr. Richard Preuss Proprioception and Postural Control in the Lumbar Spine.
Feb. 14 Dr. Michael McGillion Chronic Pain Self-Management-Vital to the Health of Canadians.
Apr. 3 Dr. Judi Hunter Seeing is believing: Mirrors, Movement, Motor Control, and Neuropathic Pain.
May 22 Dr. Anthony S. Burns Prognosis Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.
Season 2: 2008 - 2009 Oct. 16 Dr. Dimitry Sayenko Microgravity: Facts and Insight of application In Neuro-Rehabilitation.
Nov. 5 Dr. Lee R. Kirby
&
Ms. Cher Smith
Wheelchair Skills Training: Translating Research Evidence into Clinical Practice.
Dec. 11 Dr. Catriona M. Steele Treatment outcomes following a rigorous tongue pressure exercise protocol in acquired neurogenic dysphagia.
Jan. 15 Dr. Julio C. Furlan Geriatric patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: To care or not to care?
Feb. 12 Dr. Molly Verrier Wheeling/Walking Outcomes in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: How Our Data Informs Rehabilitation Practice.
Apr. 9 Dr. Danny Gagnon Sitting Pivot Transfer in Individuals with a Spinal Cord Injury : From Laboratory Assessment to Clinical Practice.
Season 3: 2009 - 2010 Aug. 18 Dr. Ariel Tankus Encoding of Speed and Direction of Movement in the Human Supplementary Motor Area.
Sep. 17 Dr. Milos Popovic FES therapy for improving grasping in individuals after SCI and brain machine interface.
Oct. 15 Dr. Pamela Houghton Electrical Stimulation Therapy for the Treatment of Pressure Sores in People with SCI.
Nov. 19 Dr. Heather Carnahan Simulation for Optimizing the Education of Physical and Occupational Therapists: Is there a role?
Dec. 17 Dr. Masae Miyatani Arterial Stiffness as a Predictor of Heart Disease - Impact of Exercises on Arterial Stiffness.
Feb. 18 Dr. Alex Mihailidis Technology Applications to Assist Persons with Dementia.
Mar. 18 Dr. Cheryl Bradbury The Impact of a Brief Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Intervention Aimed at Improving Emotional Well-Being and Quality of Life for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries.
Apr. 15 Dr. Sander Hitzig Long-Term Health after Spinal Cord Injury: Are People with SCI Prematurely Aging?
Season 4: 2010 - 2011 Oct. 21 Dr. Kristiina McConville Virtual Reality Games for Standing and Seated Balance.
Nov. 18 Dr. Keith Hayes Stem cell therapies for people with SCI: Ready for prime time?
Dec. 16 Dr. Mary Nagai Looking through a microscope at spinal cord injury.
Jan. 20 Dr. Dimitry Sayenko Rehabilitation of Motor Function: from Space to Games.
Mar. 17 Dr. Lora Giangregorio Exercise prescription for osteoporosis: practical evidence-based tips for clinicians.
Apr. 21 Dr. Santa Concepcion Huerta Olivares New Generation of Programmable Neuroprostheses: Switched Mode Power Supply Functional Electrical Stimulator.
May 19 Dr. Ethne Nussbaum An evidence based approach to treating chronic wounds using electrophysical agents: a bench to bedside program of research.
Season 5: 2011 - 2012 Oct. 27 Dr. José Zariffa Upper limb rehabilitation robotics in sub-acute spinal cord injury.
Nov. 24 Prof. Hubert deBruin Protecting Muscle Following Denervation.
Jan. 19 Prof. Jan Andrysek Developments in mobility assistive technologies and therapies in prosthetics and orthotics.
Feb. 16 Dr. César Márquez Chin Brain-Machine Interfacing at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute.
Mar. 15 Prof. Magdy Hassouna Bladder and Sexual functions in patients with Spinal Cord Injury.
Apr. 12 Prof. B. Catherine Craven Sublesional Osteoporosis – Are we a Bone Health “Best Practice” Organization?
May 31 Prof. Michael H. Ford Spine Surgery- Before, During and After.
Season 6: 2012 - 2013 Sept. 20 Dr. Hossein Rouhani Wearable technologies for daily activity monitoring: Application for clinical evaluations.
Oct. 25 Prof. Sujay Galen Functional and Neurophysiological Outcome Measures to Assess Recovery in Spinal Cord Injury.
Nov. 15 Prof. David Ditor A novel neuroprotective strategy for SCI: Pilot data regarding the use of Angiotensin II receptor blockade.
Dec. 13 Prof. Sylvie Nadeau Can we assume that persons with incomplete spinal cord injury have a symmetrical gait pattern?
Jan. 17 Prof. Cindi Morshead Neural precursor based strategies to promote self-repair of the injured brain.
Feb. 21 Prof. Paul Yoo Neuromodulation of the urinary bladder by minimally-invasive electrical nerve stimulation.
Mar. 21 Dr. Linda Rapson Acupuncture: Safe, Effective Treatment for Pain and Dysfunction.
Apr. 18 Dr. Taufik Valiante Tracking information flow through high gamma coherence in the human brain.
May 16 Prof. Babak Taati Computer Vision Technologies for Continuous and Unobtrusive Health Monitoring.
Season 7: 2013 - 2014 Sept. 19 Neural Engineering and Therapeutics (NET) Team Neural Engineering and Therapeutics (NET) Team Showcase, Part 1
Oct. 17 Dr. Graham Jones, MD A load of BS … (that’s Breath Stacking)
Dec.19 Dr. Kristen Davidge Nerve transfer surgery to improve hand function in spinal cord injury: from conceptualization to outcome
Jan. 13 Dr. Kristin Musselman Training Walking after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Recent Advances and Next Steps
Jan. 16 Dr. Jennifer Campos Toronto Rehab’s iDAPT Centre for Rehabilitation Research: Using multisensory simulation technologies to study real world mobility challenges
Jan. 30 Dr. George Mochizuki, PhD ‘Catching’ up with post-stroke spasticity: New perspectives on an old issue
Feb. 20 Neural Engineering and Therapeutics (NET) Team Neural Engineering and Therapeutics (NET) Team Showcase, Part 2
Apr. 3 Prof. Audrey Hicks Body-weight supported ambulation: a comparison between methods
Apr. 17 Dr. Sunita Mathur Skeletal muscle dysfunction in acute and chronic respiratory disease
Season 8: 2014 - 2015 Sept. 18 Chelsea Pelletier Cardiorespiratory fitness assessment and exercise prescription guidelines for adults with spinal cord injury
Oct. 16 Nicole Mittmann Economics and spinal cord injury
Nov. 27 Charles Tator Pathophysiology and Neuroprotective Strategies for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Experimental and Clinical Trials
Dec. 18 Tilak Dutta Developing better tools to support successful aging at home
Jan. 15 Ofer Levi Portable Biomedical Optical Sensing and Imaging
Feb. 19 Stephen Perry The Neuromechanics of the foot and footwear
Mar. 19 Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos Moving Into the Community: Promoting Physical Activity Among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury
Apr. 16 Mark Bayley Management of SCI patients with Concomitant injury to the Upper end of the Spinal cord (the Brain)
May. 21 Austin Bergquist The peculiar pattern of motor unit recruitment during electrical stimulation… and what’s being done about it
Season 9: 2015 - 2016 Sept. 17 Luc Tremblay The Need for Speed in Upper-Limb Reaching
Oct. 15 Avril Mansfield Promoting Safe Independent Mobility
Nov. 19 Ann Heesters Making Lists and Checking them Twice - Can we Reliably Distinguish Research from Clinical Care? Does it Matter Anymore?
Dec. 17 Allan Martin Part 1: Next-generation spinal cord MRI: quantitative measures of tissue injury in traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injury. Part 2: Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus to improve walking in chronic spinal cord injury.
Jan. 21 William Gage Examining methods of postural perturbation and thresholds to stepping recovery.
Feb. 18 Chetan Phadke Neurophysiologic impact of walking aids in persons with motor incomplete spinal cord injury.
Apr. 21 Alison Novak Considering our environment in fall prevention.
Apr. 27 Minoru "Shino" Shinohara Application of Engineering for Understanding and Improving Motor Function in Humans.
May. 19 Karl Zabjek Emerging biomedical imaging and modelling techniques within the field of spinal deformity research.
Jun. 9 Mohammad Alavinia Quality Methods to Describe UTI Frequency and Identify Process Improvement Opportunities.